Mungo Murphy

Why Bon + Vie loves Mungo Murphy:

Environmental Values:

  • Seaweed is farmed and hand-harvested responsibly on the shores of Connemara in Western Ireland.
  • All production processes take place on-site or locally in Galway, Ireland.

Social Values:

  • Small, family owned and operated business.
  • Hand-harvested seaweed is increasingly important for the West of Ireland as there is a constant threat from larger corporations that want to start using mechanical harvesters, making the hand harvesters redundant and damaging the eco-system and marine environment at the same time.

Economic Values:

  • Sustainable business model.
  • Benefits the local economy.

Transparency:

  • Information provided on their own site and directly from Founder upon request (see details below).

 

Information provided directly from Founder:

"All of our products are made using locally hand-harvested seaweed from the Connemara region in Ireland where we are based. Seaweed is a huge part of Irish coastal culture and history and the wild harvested seaweed is supplied to us by seaweed harvesters who have been harvesting seaweed for generations. The seaweed is harvested from the sea, brought onto land and washed with filtered seawater. The washed seaweed is then brought into an air drying facility where it is left to dry. Depending on the use of the seaweed, the seaweed is either milled or left whole. It is then brought to our facility and packed up for orders. Hand harvested seaweed is increasingly important for the West of Ireland as there is a constant threat from larger corporations that want to start using mechanical harvesters, making the hand harvesters redundant and damaging the eco-system and marine environment at the same time. 

The west of Ireland is so abundant with seaweed that there has not been a tradition of farming seaweed. I would like to see the industry develop by showing an increasing demand for seaweed produce, proving to the powers that be that there is a need to start farming seaweed along the Irish coast. With an increased demand in seaweed, more aquaculture licenses for farming seaweed are likely to be issued. 
The traditional uses for seaweed have been to use them for medicinal purposes, to clear bad coughs, as a healthy snack food and also to bathe in. There used to be a number of public baths around the country where people would go for their seaweed baths and it was known to be good for boosting mental health and for helping people who were suffering from depression. 
Seaweeds contain the full spectrum of vitamins, minerals, and amino acids in varying quantities, depending on type of seaweed and the time of year. The brown seaweeds we use in our seaweed bath (ascophyllum nodosum and fucus serratus) and nourishing seaweed mask products are particularly good for the skin as they contain a high concentration of elements including iodine, zinc, potassium, beta-carotene as well as the bioactive components alginic acid, ascorbic acid, carotenoids, cobalamin (vitamin B12, Vit C, B1, B2, B3, B6, E, H, K3.) fucoidans, laminarins. These bioactives help to trigger cellular responses in the skin when topically applied and are what leaves your feeling smooth, soft and hydrated after use." -- Sinead